Moon Jar, 18th century

  • Korean

Porcelain with glaze

  • Framed: Overall: 14 1/2 × 14 1/2 inches (36.8 × 36.8 cm)

Founders Society Purchase, G. Albert Lyon Fund and L.A. Young Fund, with additional funds from Mrs. George Endicott and Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Endicott

1984.2

Department

Asian Art

  • Chosen
  • Glazing (coating)
  • Ceramic
  • Porcelain
  • Jar
  • Korea
  • Moon

Moon jars like this one are made by joining together two separate bowls. Look for the seam around the center where the two halves meet. The imperfection and asymmetry, combined with the milky color, are important qualities of its harmonious beauty. Originally a simple object for storing food, in the early 1900s Korean scholars, artists, and collectors embraced the moon jar as a distinctly Korean art form.

Provenance

Kochukyo collection. (Klaus F. Naumann); 1984-present, purchase by the Detroit Institute of Arts (Detroit, Michigan, USA)

Published References

Bulletin of the DIA: Annual Report (1984): p. 11 (fig. 9.). Chang, Haely (Haeyoon). “Korea’s Moon Jars - Transported, Transfigured, and Reinterpreted.” Bulletin of the DIA 92, no. 1/4 (2018): pp. 36-38, 40 (fig. 1).

Rights Status

Korean, Moon Jar, 18th century, porcelain with glaze. Detroit Institute of Arts, Founders Society Purchase, G. Albert Lyon Fund and L.A. Young Fund, et al., 1984.2.